Article Number: PRJA83283024


Vol. 1 Issue 1, pp: (1-23), February 2016.
Article Number: PRJA83283024
Copyright ©2016
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Full Length Research Paper

Gendered decision making and adaptation to climate change in Mt. Elgon Region, Eastern Uganda

Bomuhangi1*, G. Nabanoga2, J. Namaalwa1, M. Jacobson3 and W. Gombya-Ssembajjwe2

1School of Forestry, Environment and Geographical Sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

2School of Agricultural Sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,
Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda.

3Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, College of Agricultural Sciences,
Penn State University, University Park PA 16802, USA.

*Corresponding author. Email: abomuhangi@gmail.com

 Received: January 18, 2016  Accepted: February 8, 2016  Published: February 11, 2016

ABSTRACT

This study investigates intra household level decision-making in two rural districts in the Mt Elgon region. Data was collected from 442 respondents using a household survey. Pearson Chi-Square (χ2), Multinomial and logistic regressions were used to understand the gender dimensions of decision making and barriers to climate change adaptation. The study demonstrates that coping and adaptation decisions within households are undertaken either as sole or joint decisions. Sole decisions are made either by the husband or by the wife while joint decisions are made by the husband and wife together or with other household members. However, most coping and adaptation decisions were often made either by the husband or by both the husband and wife. Seldom were decisions made individually by the wife or jointly with other household members. The study concludes that men or women may make decisions on certain coping and adaptation practices and not others implying that the kinds of coping and or adaptation practices will also determine who makes decisions.

Key words: Adaptation, Climate change, Decision making, Gender.